Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

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How does Dickens portray Pip's learning about life in two episodes of Great Expectations? Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

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When Magwitch visits Pip on a stormy night and reveals that he has been Pip's real benefactor, Pip realizes how his status as a gentleman has been dependent upon a convict who is breaking another law and jeopardizing his life by returning from Australia. But in a larger sense, Pip understands how the upper classes achieve their luxury and fine manners by exploiting the lower classes. He understands that when some people have too much, others will have too little.

The scene in which Trabb's Boy makes Pip look and feel foolish by pretending to be terrified of him and then running around the block to repeat the performance several times is one of the best things Dickens ever wrote. Pip begins to realize that he has become a dandy and a snob and furthermore that he is essentially still a lower-class nobody trying to play the role of a gentleman with somebody else's money.

 

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As a bildungsroman, Great Expectations contains many an episode in which Pip learns lessons about the world in which he...

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