How does Claudius intend to celebrate Hamlet staying in Denmark?The only thing that confused me about this question from Hamlet is that i believed the celebration (Act 1, Scene 2) to be for the...

How does Claudius intend to celebrate Hamlet staying in Denmark?

The only thing that confused me about this question from Hamlet is that i believed the celebration (Act 1, Scene 2) to be for the marriage of Claudius and Gertrude; not for Hamlet staying.

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kapokkid eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Though much of Claudius' speech is about their marriage and how they've now enjoyed the publicity of their vows and their love, his final response in the scene is to Hamlet and to indicate their plans to celebrate his agreement to stay in Denmark rather than to return to Denmark:

Why, 'tis a loving and a fair reply.
Be as ourself in Denmark. Madam, come.(125)
This gentle and unforced accord of Hamlet
Sits smiling to my heart; in grace whereof,
No jocund health that Denmark drinks today
But the great cannon to the clouds shall tell,
And the King's rouse the heaven shall bruit again,(130)
Re-speaking earthly thunder. Come away.

Claudius decides that this reply for which they wished will lead to a celebration, so the cannons will be fired and the King's drinking or celebration will echo the cannon in noise and in spirit.

So though I can understand the idea that the celebration is for his wedding to Gertrude, in these lines Claudius explains that they will be celebrating Hamlet's decisions to stay with them in Denmark.