How does Byron's poem "So We'll Go No More a Roving" connect to the principles Wordsworth outlined for poetry in "Preface to Lyrical Ballads"? Would Bryon's poem be considered a good poem in Wordsworth terms? Why or why not?

Byron's poem would be considered a good poem in Wordsworth's terms because it follows principles outlined in the "Preface to Lyrical Ballads." These include using simple language, focusing on ordinary people, expressing emotion, and using the ballad form.

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Wordsworth would consider Byron's poem "So We'll No More Go a Roving" a good poem in terms of his own literary principles.

In his "Preface to Lyrical Ballads," Wordsworth advocated for a new type of poetry that would use simple language and focus on depicting common people in positive ways....

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Wordsworth would consider Byron's poem "So We'll No More Go a Roving" a good poem in terms of his own literary principles.

In his "Preface to Lyrical Ballads," Wordsworth advocated for a new type of poetry that would use simple language and focus on depicting common people in positive ways. This constituted a revolt against neoclassical poetry, a type of poetry that made allusions to Greek and Roman literature only an educated person would be certain to understand. Such poetry also focused itself on great men. In contrast, Wordsworth championed a poetry of the common folk. The title of Coleridge's and his book of poems, Lyrical Ballads, captures two chief principles he was aiming at: Wordsworth wanted poetry to be lyrical, which means to express emotion, and he also wished to embrace the ballads or folk stories of common people.

Keeping these ideas in mind, we can see why Wordsworth would approve of Byron's poem. First, it uses simple language. It primarily uses ordinary, one-syllable words such as "heart" and "love" that anyone would know. It makes no allusions to figures such as Agamemnon, Athena, or Aeneas: it doesn't assume its readers are steeped in classical literature.

Second, it focuses on expressing emotion. It is about a lover accepting that his beloved needs to take a break from the intensity of their love affair. While the speaker's heart is "still as loving" as it was, he sadly accepts that he and his beloved will no longer go roving in the moonlight.

Third, the poem focuses on plain, unnamed persons whose specific identities are unimportant. They could be anyone. Finally, the poem takes the form of a ballad, with the refrain "we'll go no more a roving" capturing the oral rhythms of folk songs. Wordsworth would give this poem two thumbs up.

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