How does Brutus try to convince the mob that it was right to kill Caesar? Mention: What he says and does,Rhetorical and litery devices,how he treats the mob and the way he reacts to the body being brought in. How does Brutus try to convince the mob that it was right to kill Ceaser? Mention: What he says and does,Rhetorical and litery devices,how he treats the mob and the way he reacts to the body being brought in. Thats a hard one..

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Brutus juxtaposes his crime with those of Caesar. His act of violence was against one man, and he did it to stop Caesar's crimes, which were against the Roman Republic and indeed against liberty itself. Those who love liberty, he claims, cannot view what Brutus has done as a crime....

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Brutus juxtaposes his crime with those of Caesar. His act of violence was against one man, and he did it to stop Caesar's crimes, which were against the Roman Republic and indeed against liberty itself. Those who love liberty, he claims, cannot view what Brutus has done as a crime. It was, in fact, a patriotic act, and, since Caesar was Brutus's friend, ultimately a self-sacrificial act.

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Brutus appeals to the rationality and the patriotism of the Roman crowd, believing that his appeals will be sufficient.  His rhetoric, in contrast to that of Marc Antony, does not contain appeals to the more visceral desires of man such as greed and revenge.

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Brutus says surprisingly little to explain to the mob the murder of Caesar. The bulk of his defense consists of the following few lines, in which I have highlighted his major claims:

If then that friend demand

why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer:

—Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved

Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and

die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live

all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him;

as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was

valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I

slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his

fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his

ambition. Who is here so base that would be a

bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended.

Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If

any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so

vile that will not love his country? If any, speak;

for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.

 

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