How does Boo Radley "come of age" in To Kill a Mockingbird? like scout and jem gave specfic details how they "come to age" but how does Boo?

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, Boo Radley prefers to remain inside his home. Because of his reclusive nature, he is often the subject of many tales and exaggerations among Maycomb County residents. For example, when small crimes or unexplained events occur, Boo often receives the blame. However, by the end of the story, the children learn that Boo is actually a generous and giving man. Boo seems to be somewhat entertained by the children's fascination with him and his home. He begins leaving them small gifts in the knothole of a tree. While Jem suspects that Boo is the mystery benefactor, he has no proof. Additionally, Boo goes outside once to cover Scout in a blanket as she watches Miss Maudie's house burn. The reader begins to see changes in Boo in that he begins outwardly showing concern for the children.

Boo's "coming of age" in the story occurs near the end, and his "coming of age" is different from that of the children. Since Boo is an adult throughout the story, his "coming of age" is the moment when he leaves the comfort of his home to save the children from Bob Ewell. Boo's sacrifice is selfless. He carries Jem home and remains there in spite of his reclusive nature until he sees for himself that Jem is safe and well. His "coming of age" results in placing others before himself. In the last chapter, Scout refers to "Boo's children." She is referring to herself and Jem. This statement confirms the growth in the relationship between the children and Boo.

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Boo Radley, though an adult in years, is much like a child. He is still living with family despite his adulthood, and he is still serving his "restriction" imposed on him by his father for the juvenile pranks in which he was involved. He is sequestered in the house and does not work outside the home. He seeks the company of children, Scout and Jem, in a "hide and seek" fashion. In short, he is not acting as an adult or "of age".

He does achieve this status when he rescues Scout and Jem from Bob Ewell's knife attack. He must leave his childhood home and confront an adult situation as an adult. When he is present at Jem's bedside, is is now of this world. His conversation with Scout on the way home confirms this "coming of age".

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