How does the author (Knowles) show the characters in A Separate Peace change over time?I am having trouble writing an essay and finding character development throughout the book. It's due tomorrow...

How does the author (Knowles) show the characters in A Separate Peace change over time?

I am having trouble writing an essay and finding character development throughout the book. It's due tomorrow and I'm super stressed... Can you help me out?

Asked on by starlette23

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Brinker Hadley is the ultimate big man on campus in the early parts of the story. Dressed in "his gray gabardine suit with square, hand-sewn-looking jacket pockets, a conservative necktie, and dark brown cordovan shoes," Brinker thrived on being involved in all the political offices and student government activities on campus. He did his best to make sure everyone else understood that he was important because of the offices he held, and he made it his business to be aware of all the events that impacted any of the other students so that the rules could be enforced as needed.

The first change in Brinker's conduct and attitude toward the regimentation of Devon appeared as the planning of the Winter Carnival progressed. Brinker had dropped his suggestion of enlisting when Gene refused to join him in doing so, and had withdrawn from many of his school government activities. His first act of open defiance, however, came when Gene appealed to Brinker to help with the Winter Carnival as a means of cheering up Finny. Brinker isn't enthusiastic at first, but changes his ways.

'There's never been a Winter Carnival here. I think there's probably a rule against it.' 'I see,' I said in a tone which made Brinker raise his eyes and lock them with mine. In that plotters' glance all his doubts vanished, for Brinker the Lawgiver had turned rebel for the Duration.

Brinker reverts back to his self-assumed role of enforcer-of-the-rules when he assumes the role of prosecuting attorney in the investigation of Finny's accident. "he's imagining himself Justice incarnate, balancing the scales." The investigation is abruptly ended, however, before Brinker is able to ascertain the facts of the incident.

By the end of the book, Brinker is disillusioned with the expectations of society and angry that he is caught in situations over which he has no control.

I'll be damned if I'll have that Nathan Hale attitude of his about it. It's all that World War I malarkey that gets me...I'm not any kind of hero, and neither are you. And neither is the old man, and he never was, and I don't care what he says he almost did at Chateau-Thierry.

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