How does Hurst use language to develop the characters, plot, and setting of "The Scarlet Ibis"?If you can list a few examples of sensory details, connatative and figurative language....

How does Hurst use language to develop the characters, plot, and setting of "The Scarlet Ibis"?

If you can list a few examples of sensory details, connatative and figurative language. Evaluate them.

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troutmiller eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Hurst develops characterization in both Doodle and the narrator. The most powerful scene for the narrator is when he cries and his father asks him why. It states, "that Doodle walked only because I was ashamed of having a crippled brother." Doodle is characterized when he chooses to bury the dead scarlet ibis. The description of the large shovel he uses shows us just how small he is, and yet just how big his heart is.

The plot is developed as the narrator pushes Doodle past his limits. He runs, he jumps, he climbs, he swims--all to please his brother. "That streak of cruelty within me awakened" and the narrator left his brother in the storm. The rain "roared through the pines" and the lightening burst "like a Roman candle." There were lots of sensory details in the end with the storm and the bird that furthered the plot.

The setting in Old Woman Swamp is beautifully described. "Promise hung about us like the leaves, and wherever we looked, ferns unfurled and birds broke into song."

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The Scarlet Ibis

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