How does Arthur Conan Doyle make the ending of "How It Happened" so effective?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

With the title, "How It Happened," Sir Arthur Conan Doyle sets up his readers to expect that they will read a straightforward narrative of a significant event, and the bulk of the story is just that: a combination of operator error and mechanical failure that results in a horrific car crash. Because the driver describes in such detail the sensations of the long downhill run and near misses on a series of three perilous curves, readers expect that the story will end with his miraculous survival, since he is telling the tale.

The story's ending really begins with the driver becoming "aware of my own existence once more," a clever and effective device that the first-time reader accepts as an account of the driver regaining consciousness after the impact. It...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 405 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial
Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles
Approved by eNotes Editorial Team