How does the atmosphere of the bunkhouse in chapter two contrast with the natural scene at the pond in chapter one? (From John Steinbeck's novel Of Mice and Men.)I'm not sure how this question...

How does the atmosphere of the bunkhouse in chapter two contrast with the natural scene at the pond in chapter one? (From John Steinbeck's novel Of Mice and Men.)

I'm not sure how this question should be answered. Help?

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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The atmosphere between the bunkhouse, as seen in chapter two, and the pond as seen in chapter one, differ greatly in John Steinbeck's novel Of Mice and Men.

First, the atmosphere at the pond is one that is relaxed by the nature which surrounds Lennie and George. Even though they do argue in this chapter, the argument seems to be one which they have had before. Neither man is challenged by anything. Overall, the atmosphere is calming--to the men and the reader alike.

As for the atmosphere of the bunkhouse, as the men enter, one feels as if nature has been erased. The "white-washed" walls and "unpainted" floors seem to demolish all which is uplifting. Even the light which comes into the bunkhouse has been distorted, and controlled, by man. Nature, and therefore the calm, has been removed. The first time Lennie and George are spoken to they are put on the defensive. Everyone seems to questions them about all aspects of their lives.

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