How does Arthur miller use small conflicts to escalate the central conflict in The Crucible? Are there other examples other than using the example between Proctor and Elizabeth, because I have...

How does Arthur miller use small conflicts to escalate the central conflict in The Crucible?

Are there other examples other than using the example between Proctor and Elizabeth, because I have already used that. 

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e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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There are a number of conflicts in the play. These conflicts can be seen as primary and secondary conflicts, but there is no single principal conflict. The problem that is to be solved in the play's resolution is multifaceted as it concerns both John Proctor and the witch trials.

If we take John Proctor's narrative line as one of the primary conflicts (as he faces a moral conflict and also death in the guise of a dilemma of integrity) and the trials as another conflict (as they represent a moral corruption of the town, posing individual conscience against collective fear, cowardice and vice), we can assess the play's other conflicts as secondary. 

These conflicts include Hale's moral turmiol and Mary Warren's graphically represented moral dilemma. These characters experience a crisis of conscience that is representative of the town's moral challenge. Should they stand up for what they individually recognize as right and true or allow their opinions to be subsumed by the mass? 

Hale attempts to stand up for his beliefs and stop the trials or at least stop Proctor's sentence from being carried out, but Mary Warren dramatically fails when her integrity is tested. 

These secondary conflicts help to articulate the stakes of the play's primary conflicts as well as expressing the play's themes. 

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