How does Anthony Trollope use The Warden to communicate and spread information?

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The Warden is the first of the Barchester Chronicles, the series of six novels for which Anthony Trollope is best known. It is an uncharacteristic book for Trollope, being much shorter, more focused, and more polemical than his later work. Trollope explains in his autobiography that he wrote the book...

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The Warden is the first of the Barchester Chronicles, the series of six novels for which Anthony Trollope is best known. It is an uncharacteristic book for Trollope, being much shorter, more focused, and more polemical than his later work. Trollope explains in his autobiography that he wrote the book with a specific purpose in mind: to discuss the misuse of endowments and funds in the possession of the Church of England, which were being diverted from the charitable purposes for which they were originally intended.

Trollope communicates information on this topic in several ways throughout the novel. One of the principal characters, the Reverend Mr. Harding, has a sinecure as the Warden of Hiram's Hospital. He finds himself at the center of a heated debate when John Bold, a local reformer, brings his situation to the attention of a journalist named Tom Towers, who writes about Mr. Harding's situation in his newspaper, The Jupiter. Some celebrated writers join the debate, so the reader also has the perspective of Dr. Pessimist Anticant (based on Thomas Carlyle) and Mr. Popular Sentiment (based on Charles Dickens). Mr. Harding's friends even consult the Attorney-General, Sir Abraham Haphazard, who gives his legal opinion on the matter. This mixture of legal advice, journalism, popular moralizing, and conversation between the characters allowed Trollope to communicate a great deal of information on the topic in the space of an unusually short novel.

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