Discuss Anne's concluding thoughts about Civil Rights in America based on the ending of her work.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I think that the ending of the work is profound in not only its implications on Moody's own experience, but the work of the Civil Rights Movement, in general.  The idea of "wonder" that closes the work is quite indicative of the resistance and inertia that is present in the way of change.  This helps to bring out how both the individual work and the general feel of the movement, in general, are far from certain.  Moody's note of reflection helps to bring out the fact that the movement or any wide ranging social change can never really be "done."  There is more to work as "the fight goes on, the cause endures, and the dream will never die."  In this ending, Moody brings to light that there is much more work to be done on an individual and social level.  Rather than a note of sadness, I tend to see her ending as more of a call to action, dependent on the reader to take up the charge where she has left off.  In this, Moody's assessment of bother her work in the movement and the movement, in general, is dependent on others taking up the cause and being able to continue her work.  If others do not do this, then her note of wondering at the end of the work will be a note of disquietude in a setting where there should be complete submission to the goal of social change and social transformation.

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