How does Alice use size to her advantage in Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland? She gets bigger and smaller by eating and drinking.

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Alice has some problems with her size when she first arrives in Wonderland. For example, she would love to enter a beautiful garden she sees, but the door to it is much too small for her to fit through. When she drinks a bottle of delicious liquid that shrinks her,...

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Alice has some problems with her size when she first arrives in Wonderland. For example, she would love to enter a beautiful garden she sees, but the door to it is much too small for her to fit through. When she drinks a bottle of delicious liquid that shrinks her, she is very frustrated to find she has left the key to the door to the garden on a glass table. She is now much too small to reach it, so she cries. Then a cake appears under the table. When Alice eats all of it she grows so big her head bumps the ceiling. She can reach the key but certainly can't fit through the door. When she shrinks one more time to a tiny size, she doesn't have the key, but is swept away with other animals by the tears she has shed.

By the time she has the magic mushrooms in her hands, however, some of which make her tall and some small, she is careful to eat from the correct hand and in the correct amounts to control her height. When she arrives back at the hall with the key, the glass table, and the door to the beautiful garden, she makes sure she has the garden key in hand before she nibbles enough mushroom to shrink to one foot high. Finally, she can open the door. And, as the text says:

then—she found herself at last in the beautiful garden, among the bright flower-beds and the cool fountains.

Through her earlier deep frustration at not thinking through the variables of shrinking and yet needing a key, Alice has learned to plan ahead and coordinate. This leads her to success.

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At the beginning of Alice in Wonderland, Alice becomes small (having swallowed the contents of a bottle labeled "DRINK ME"), enabling her to enter a small door in order to follow the White Rabbit.

At another point in the story, Alice has entered the White Rabbit's house and grown too large to leave (having had a drink from a bottle she finds there). Eating cakes she finds on the floor reduces her size so that she can escape before the White Rabbit can burn his house down with Alice in it.

At the story's conclusion, during the trial of the Jack (Knave) of Hearts, chaos ensues—yet again. (This is a normal occurrence in Wonderland.) Alice begins to grow again, and with her increased size, she becomes more confident, standing up to the Queen of Hearts and the others. When the Queen demands that Alice's head be cut off, Alice  tells them she is not frightened of them because she surmises that they are simply playing a hand of cards.

At this point, Alice wakes from her "dream."

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