In "The Fall of the House of Usher," how does Poe portray the interior world of Roderick Usher's fantasy and explore the inner workings of his imagination?

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The various supersititions and fantasy world of Roderick Usher in this Gothic classic are conveyed through the medium of the anonymous narrator, who takes the form of an old friend of Roderick's who has been asked to spend some time with him in his house to help his friend recover. It is clear from the introduction of the story, when the narrator arrives and looks upon the House of Usher, that the house itself is an important character of this short story, and as he spends time with Roderick, and finds his old friend a "bounden slave" to an "anomalous species of terror," that the house itself is part of this terror and is a vital part of the terrifying imagination and fantasy that Roderick constructs and oppresses him so severely. Note what the narrator tells us:

He was enchained by certain superstitious impressions in regard to the dwelling which he tenanted, and whence for many years, he had never ventured forth--in regard to an influence whose supposititious force was conveyed in terms too shadowy here to be re-stated--an influence which some peculiarities in the mere form and substance of his family mansion, had, by dint of long sufferance, he said, obtained over his spirit--an effect which the physique of the grey walls and turrets, and of the dim tarn into which they all looked down, had, at length, brought about upon the morale of his existence.

We can therefore see that a key element of the interior fantasy and imagination of Roderick Usher relates to the powerful bond that exists between himself and his family home, and, of course, his sister. This is a bond that is so strong that it unites them all in a common doom and end, as even the house at the finale of the tale is destroyed.

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