From Baucis and Philemon, examine how the following quote represents the theme of appearances being deceiving:  "At last they came upon a little hovel of the humblest sort, poorer than any they...

From Baucis and Philemon, examine how the following quote represents the theme of appearances being deceiving:  "At last they came upon a little hovel of the humblest sort, poorer than any they had yet found, with a roof made of reeds. but here, when they knoked, the door was opened wide and a cheerful voice bade them enter."

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The original question had to be edited down.  I would suggest that the quote reflects the theme of appearances can be deceiving in a couple of ways.  The first would be that the impoverished condition of the hut  belies the generosity and care that becomes so intrinsic to the elderly couple.  The appearance of the hovel does not communicate the generosity of heart and spirit that is a part of the home.  Certainly, Zeus and Hermes visited better homes, more wealthy homes, and dwellings that were more formidable.  The appearances of these homes would have indicated that they had the means to be more generous.  The reality in which appearances proved to be deceiving is that they were not.  In the same light, the description of Baucis and Philemon's home as one that reflects so much economic challenge is one in which its appearance would indicate that there is little to offer in way of generosity.  Yet, it is in this impoverished hovel that the travelers experience the greatest amount of generosity.  It is here where I think that the quote and the situation from the myth substantiate the idea that appearances can be deceiving.

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