How do you think the speaker is using the phrase "the little children's dower” in line of "Home-thoughts, From Abroad"?

In the poem "Home-thoughts, From Abroad" by Robert Browning, the poet uses the phrase "the little children's dower" to express his belief that the beauties of the English countryside are part of the inheritance or birthright of all English people.

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In the poem "Home-thoughts, From Abroad" by Robert Browning , the poet expresses a longing for England in springtime. Browning wrote it while on a visit to Italy, and he expresses obvious sentimentality for the plants and birds that offer beauty in the English countryside. He first speaks...

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In the poem "Home-thoughts, From Abroad" by Robert Browning, the poet expresses a longing for England in springtime. Browning wrote it while on a visit to Italy, and he expresses obvious sentimentality for the plants and birds that offer beauty in the English countryside. He first speaks of April and then of May, indicating that he has been away from his homeland for an extended period of time. He describes the songs and activities of the chaffinch, swallows, whitethroat, and thrush; he praises plants in leaf around an elm tree bole and the leaning pear tree that scatters "blossoms and dewdrops." In all of these descriptions, readers feel a keen and sincere longing for home. Even the first word in the poem, "Oh," is an expression of the poet's homesickness.

The phrase "the little children's dower" is in the midst of the closing comparison of the poem. In the Cambridge English Dictionary, the definition of "dower" is "a share of a man's money and property that belongs to his widow after he dies; or, an old word for dowry." Synonyms and related words for "dower" include "bequest," "inheritance," and "legacy."

Browning calls the buttercups that bloom in English fields "the little children's dower" and says that they are much brighter than the "gaudy melon-flower" that grows in Italy where he is writing the poem. In calling the buttercups, and in general the fields and natural places in England, "the little children's dower," Browning is saying that the spring beauty he is describing is the inheritance or birthright of English children. As an adult, he still feels the sense of belonging to his home country that he felt as a child, and that is why he longs for it so strongly when he finds himself in a faraway land.

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