How do you say it is not ok to do something in a National Park in Japanese? e.g. It is not ok to litter in a national park.For example, "It is not ok to litter in a National Park". Please help. I...

How do you say it is not ok to do something in a National Park in Japanese? e.g. It is not ok to litter in a national park.

For example, "It is not ok to litter in a National Park".

Please help. I can't find any information on this.  Thank you.  I would appreciate some help.

Asked on by chendie

3 Answers | Add Yours

dymatsuoka's profile pic

dymatsuoka | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The Japanese language has different ways of saying things depending on the context.  For example, if you were to put a prohibition against littering on a sign, you would write

"Gomisute Kinshi",

which would be equivalent in translation to "No littering" or "Littering is prohibited".  "Kinshi" is the word indicating prohibition, and the first word will vary depending on what is being prohibited.

If you were a ranger asking a tourist not to litter, you would say,

"Kokuritsu-kooen no naka dewa gomi o sutenai de kudasai",

which roughly translated would be the polite request, "Please do not litter in the National Park".

If you were a parent cautioning a child not to litter, you would say,

"Kokuritsu-kooen de goi o sutete wa inkemasen",

which is similar to the previous request, but less formal.

Interestingly, there is no specific word for littering in Japan; for a person to litter would be a great shame, and there is little need to caution people not to do so.  The above translations use the word "gomi" or "goi" to indicate "trash" or "dirt"; literally, the prohibition is against leaving one's trash or dirt behind.

 

litchick2011's profile pic

litchick2011 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted on

I assume that you want this translated, am I correct? I am not a fluent or even casual speaker of Japanese, but one thing you might want to try is www.dictionary.com. It has a translator that will give you a rough approximation of how a phrase should be written.

それは良く国立公園で散らかることではないです。

This is a cut and paste of the Japanse characters.

Another website you might want to try is an online language lab:

http://learnjapanese.elanguageschool.net/

If all else fails, check out www.rosettastone.com.

sxh967's profile pic

sxh967 | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

The answer from dymatsuoka is a perfectly good one, but I would like to offer another way to translate/express this sentiment.

Depending on the situation and the person being addressed, Japanese people often like to mould the way they say things to make it as nice and unassertive as possible. As a result, we get phrases like the one above.

If you click on the first link in the references section, you will see a sign which reads:

「ゴミは各自でお持ち帰りください」

or in roman letters (using wa for the ha particle)


"Gomi wa kakuji de o mochi kaeri kudasai"

This translates to:

"Please take your litter (home) with you"

To make it even more friendly and polite (and a bit shorter), you can change the above sentence to,


「ゴミは持ち帰りましょう」

"Gomi wa mochi kaeri mashou"

Which gives it a feeling of,

"Let's all be sure to take our litter (home) with us"

I see this phrase used most often in public parks so I recommend it!

Thanks for the question!

 

Sources:

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