How do you get power in Autocracy and Democracy? You have to compare and contrast the two.

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Both autocracy and democracy are forms of government.  In an autocracy, one person has power.  That person has absolute say over the government.  There are many ways an autocrat can come to power.  An autocrat can come to power by overthrowing an existing government and declaring himself a dictator, such...

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Both autocracy and democracy are forms of government.  In an autocracy, one person has power.  That person has absolute say over the government.  There are many ways an autocrat can come to power.  An autocrat can come to power by overthrowing an existing government and declaring himself a dictator, such as Fidel Castro.  An autocrat can also achieve his position through inheritance, such as the ruling line of North Korea.  

A democracy allows the people more of a voice in the government, as the people decide who rules them.  While America is not a true democracy in that we elect representatives, government on the local level is often a democracy.  One should be popular to be selected to be in charge of a democratic government, whereas in the autocracy one's popularity has little to do with being in charge.  

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While I agree with the first answer that power in an autocracy can be seized, that is not the only way that a ruler can get power.  There are other ways, especially later on in the life of the autocracy.

The most common (historical) way for an autocrat to get power was to inherit it in some way.  Many monarchies have essentially been autocracies.  But in these governmental systems, each autocrat did not have to seize power.  Someone in the past had seized power and then that power had been handed down through the generations.  You can see this in the modern world in, for example, North Korea (not a monarchy, but power has been handed down from father to son to this point).

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