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With respect to cameras being installed in the workplace, what argument can be made to say that this is not an invasion of privacy?

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There are many strong arguments to be made for this point of view.  This is particularly true when the employer is a private company and not a government entity.  Let us look at the two most important reasons why cameras in the workplace are not an invasion of privacy.

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There are many strong arguments to be made for this point of view.  This is particularly true when the employer is a private company and not a government entity.  Let us look at the two most important reasons why cameras in the workplace are not an invasion of privacy.

First, the workplace is a public environment.  When we are at work, we do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy.  We have no reason to believe that our actions will not be seen by other people.  This would, of course, be different if the employer were putting cameras on areas like bathrooms or changing rooms.  In such places (even at work) we expect to be private.  By contrast, a camera in a public area of the workplace does not violate a reasonable expectation of privacy.

Second, the cameras are there for a legitimate purpose.  Businesses do not put cameras up simply to have pictures of their employees.  Instead, they are trying to do things like reduce theft of company property.  This is something that is clearly within the company’s right to do.

Thus, cameras in the workplace are in a public place (public to anyone who works at the firm) and are there for an important purpose.  This means that they are not an invasion of worker privacy. 

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