Shakespeare's Sonnets Questions and Answers
by William Shakespeare

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How do you analyze the entire Shakespearean "Sonnet 147"? 

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Marietta Sadler eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The speaker of this sonnet is lovesick and in the poem reflects on how this love has affected him. In the first line he uses a simile ("My love is as a fever") to compare the love to an illness, and the next part of the sentence ("longing still / For that which longer nurseth the disease") also suggests that the love is like a compulsion. The more he longs for, or desires, the object of his love, the worse the "disease" becomes.

The next line ("Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill") suggests that the love is like a parasite. It feeds on and exacerbates his illness without giving him any succor in return. Or, alternatively, his love is like an insatiable glutton. It has an appetite that can't be satisfied, and the more it feeds, the hungrier and more gluttonous it becomes.

In lines five to seven, the speaker says that his love has made him irrational. His reason, personified as "the physician to (his) love," tells him to stop this self-destructive love, but is ignored. Consequently...

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trewterterwtretre

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Who is the mistress?