How do I write a thesis statement about A Christmas Carol?

Expert Answers
kcoleman2016 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

When writing specifically about the novel A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens, here are some interesting questions to help you brainstorm a good argumentative thesis. 

  • Has Ebenezer Scrooge truly changed in a permanent way by the end of the novel?
  • What is the significance of the theme of time in the novel?
  • How do other characters in this novel serve to develop Scrooge as a dynamic, complex character? 
  • How are the themes of Greed, Generosity, and Forgiveness developed over the course of the novel? 
  • What is the major conflict of the novel? 
  • How did Dickens' context influence the creation of A Christmas Carol
  • What social commentary does Dickens make in his novel? 
  • What is the significance of the symbol of music?

Use these as brainstorm questions about the major characters, themes, symbols, conflicts, and elements of the novel to develop a great thesis!

kcoleman2016 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Well, that depends on whether or not your teacher has assigned you a prompt that you should answering with your thesis statement, or if he/she has allowed you to develop your own argument entirely. 

Regardless of whether or not your thesis is in response to a specified prompt, it should always be an argumentative claim. Many people have trouble ensuring that their thesis statements are argumentative, not simply observations or statements of fact. An argumentative thesis claims some sort of connection or relationship between two elements of the text, whether it is a cause-effect, reciprocal, a similarity, a difference, or some other relationship. 

If you are unsure about whether or not your thesis statement is an argument, the easiest "cheat" to check is to include the word "because". This automatically inserts a cause-effect relationship into your thesis statement around which you can build your argument. 

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A Christmas Carol

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