How do the transformations of the word "dedicate" impact the developmental ideas in the Gettysburg Address?

Abraham Lincoln utilizes many uses of "dedicate" in his Gettysburg Address as a way to structure his narrative from past, to present, and then to the future. He first proclaims the Founding Fathers' dedication to equality, connecting it to the dedication the soldiers had on the battlefield. He then states that they already dedicated the battlefield to themselves through their sacrifice, and finally he asks for a dedication to an end of the war.

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When Abraham Lincoln delivered his address at Gettysburg, his purpose was at least two-fold. He was there to dedicate the military cemetery, but he was also there to tell his audience and the nation that though the battles of the war were difficult, they must stay in the fight until...

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When Abraham Lincoln delivered his address at Gettysburg, his purpose was at least two-fold. He was there to dedicate the military cemetery, but he was also there to tell his audience and the nation that though the battles of the war were difficult, they must stay in the fight until reunification of the nation was achieved.

The use of the word "dedicated" first refers to his evocation of the founding fathers and how they dedicated a nation committed to equality. The second use questions whether this dedicated nation can endure until the war resolves the question of reunification.

The third use denotes the primary reason that Lincoln had been invited to Gettysburg that day: to dedicate the cemetery that is the final resting place of soldiers killed there in the war's bloodiest battle. In his next use of the word "dedicate," Lincoln proclaims that they cannot really dedicate the cemeteryin other words, to make it a meaningful placebecause the men who had given their lives there had already made it sacred.

The next and final two uses of the word marks a turning point in Lincoln's remarks. He turns his focus to the idea that the living have an obligation to the dead to finish out the war so that their deaths will not have been in vain. He asserts that they must have the same kind of dedication to the country as the men who had founded it "four score and seven years" earlier.

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