How do the shared values of The Tempest and Hag-Seed resonate in different contexts?

The shared values of The Tempest and Hag-Seed include paternal love for a daughter, the importance of creativity, and the dangers of obsession. These themes resonate in the respective isolated contexts of the island and the prison, where the protagonist struggles to realize his vision in a challenging environment.

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The Tempest and Hag-Seed both indicate that the authors value a father’s love, especially for his daughter. In addition, both attribute a positive meaning to creativity, showing it as a necessary element in solving thorny problems. In both cases, these values are put to the text in isolation from society;...

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The Tempest and Hag-Seed both indicate that the authors value a father’s love, especially for his daughter. In addition, both attribute a positive meaning to creativity, showing it as a necessary element in solving thorny problems. In both cases, these values are put to the text in isolation from society; in one case, this is a remote island, and in the other case, it is a prison. By establishing restricted physical boundaries, the authors can show the emotional and psychological obstacles that the main character faces as he works toward accomplishing his goals.

In both works, the protagonist is a man with great creative powers which are exercised primarily through words. While William Shakespeare makes Prospero a magician, he performs his art through spells. In Margaret Atwood’s novel, Felix is a theatrical artistic director. Both men have a daughter named Miranda. In Shakespeare’s case, the baby girl was marooned with her father, while in Atwood’s case, the young Miranda died. What the fathers share is a deep but rather unhealthy devotion to their daughters. Prospero tries to manipulate nature as well as people in order to sway her to marry the right man. Felix’s obsession with her memory derails his career for years.

The Tempest plays out on an island with few inhabitants, while Hag-Seed is set both in a remote rural area and a prison. These settings and the supporting characters found there place severe constraints on the protagonists' ability to fulfill their plans.

The negative qualities of both men also shape the works. Both authors imply their disapproval for obsession and revenge as motivations. Both Prospero and Felix ultimately achieve their goals but also recognize that they must place limits on their power or set aside their obsession.

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