How do the images in the final stanza convey the speaker's attitude towards the death of his loved one in "Funeral Blues"?

In "Funeral Blues," the images in the final stanza convey the speaker's attitude towards the death of his loved one by creating images of a world in which life is not sustainable. This world is dark, and the oceans are to be emptied. This implies that life as he has known it is over.

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In a nutshell, the images in the final stanza convey that the speaker is utterly devastated and cannot imagine living in a world without his loved one.

The first two lines create an image of complete darkness, in which the stars have been “put out,” the moon has been “[packed]...

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In a nutshell, the images in the final stanza convey that the speaker is utterly devastated and cannot imagine living in a world without his loved one.

The first two lines create an image of complete darkness, in which the stars have been “put out,” the moon has been “[packed] up,” and the sun “[dismantled].” The words “put out,” “pack,” and “dismantle” are instructive, and the speaker is telling his reader that these things should be done. The implication is that there is no space left in the world for light. There is only darkness and all-consuming grief.

The third line contains images of the ocean being poured away, and of all the wood being swept up. The image of the ocean being poured away is meant to depict a world where there is no water. This implies that the speaker’s attitude is that life is not worth living in the face of a loss of this magnitude. The idea of sweeping up the wood creates the idea of an inability to make fire, which adds to the image of a world in which life is not sustainable.

When combined, the images in this final stanza create a picture of darkness, thirst, and endless coldness. They convey that the speaker’s attitude is that light and life are no longer sustainable. This attitude is summed up in the final line, in which the speaker essentially states that nothing good will ever happen again.

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