How do the final paragraphs about Ruckel’s life as an adult in Jon Hamilton's article "Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Show How Parents Shape A Child's Brain" contribute to the greater message of the text?

In Jon Hamilton's article "Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Show How Parents Shape A Child's Brain," the final paragraphs on Izidor Ruckel's life as an adult show the potential for the brain to continue developing in adulthood, allowing those deprived of parents in early childhood to overcome their trauma.

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In his article "Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Show How Parents Shape A Child's Brain," Jon Hamilton tells the story of Izidor Ruckel. Ruckel contracted polio when he was six months old, and his parents never returned to the hospital after leaving him there. He was sent to an orphanage at the age of three. Although a woman at the orphanage initially cared for Ruckel like a mother, she died after he had been there for a few years, and he was left in a frightening and lawless environment in which beatings and other forms of brutality were common.

The main focus of the...

(The entire section contains 297 words.)

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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on December 14, 2020