How do the characters in Rhinoceros conform with the mob? What techniques and characterization are involved in this conformation?

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In Rhinoceros, the gradual takeover of society by the beasts is made to seem natural and, therefore, inevitable. Eugene Ionesco presents the protagonist, Bérenger, as a conventional person with normal goals and aspirations. Initially, as he does not question his society’s values, he is not motivated to challenge them. Everyone is equally confused by the animals running loose. As a few individuals realize that the animals are transformed humans, they wonder what is happening but do not try to stop it. As more people change, Bérenger continues to observe but remains unaffected; he regards their behavior, like their new appearance, as aberrant. A few exceptions do not affect society overall.

Between acts 2 and 3, after his friend Jean becomes a rhinoceros and attacks him, Bérenger starts to understand that he is now in the minority, which everyone else identifies as abnormal. When his girlfriend, Daisy, leaves him to join the herd, he is left solitary and alienated. Because he clings to his humanity, now fiercely resisting the universal transformation, the human condition as Ionesco presents it is precisely that combination of isolation and resistance to mob rule.

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In the most simplistic of senses, the people of the mob conform because they become savages.  In becoming the mob, all of the people who become rhinoceroses demonstrate savage behavior.  They lose any sight of delicacy or nuances.  Their hostility towards humans is almost a threat in its own right that either they join the movement of rhinos or face the consequence.  In trying to enforce their will, the rhinos barrel through the town, running over and through anyone in their path.  Additionally, all of the rhinos represent the same mass.  They all act alike, causing destruction around the town and represent the force of homogeneous collectivity.  Once the townspeople become rhinos, they act as one another, en masse.  Individuality, like Berenger's, is repudiated in favor of this mob and this group.  Their voices are not intelligible, and their appearance is not really distinguishable from one another.  This conformity makes Berenger's hold out all the more admirable, albeit one that is steeped in failure.  The implications are fairly clear in that while Berenger will probably fail, there is a great deal of honor and respect that the audience has for maintaining his individuality in the name of conformity.  Despite his vacillation in position, wishing and yearning to join the movement and then rejecting it, either by necessity or resurgent courage, the audience ends up identifying with Berenger.  We have to.  Ionesco leaves us few other options.  I mean, the mob is not going to be an option if it can be helped for audience identification.

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