Why is this case called "Gregg v. Georgia?"  See explanation below."Gregg Vs. Georgia" confuses me. Why vs.?  I don't understand how these two seperate things are against each other, or why they...

Why is this case called "Gregg v. Georgia?"  See explanation below.

"Gregg Vs. Georgia" confuses me. Why vs.?  I don't understand how these two seperate things are against each other, or why they are given that name. I may just not understand supreme court cases, and who is in charge of them.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Cases that come before courts (any court, not just the Supreme Court) are brought by one party against another party.  In other words, someone is suing someone else or someone is being charged with a crime by a state.  The names of the two parties become the name of the case.  They are separated by "vs." to show that the two parties are in conflict with one another.

With the Gregg case, the original name of the case would have been Georgia v. Gregg because the state of Georgia was charging him with murder.  He was convicted of the murder and appealed his case.  Once the case is appealed, its name can change.  In that case, it is the name of the party that is appealing that comes first.  Therefore, it became Gregg v. Georgia because Gregg was essentially suing the state of Georgia, saying that the law under which he was prosecuted was unconstitutional.

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