How do I start my english monologue on Othello? I need to fill in a gap and silence within the play.  I was thinking at the start, where Iago is waiting for Roderigo. Also could you please give me a brief description on what a normal monolgue structure is? I can never start these things. Help needed!

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You've selected an ideal moment for your monologue, so here are some tips for getting started with your writing. First of all, a monologue is different from a Shakespearean soliloquy , so you have a decision to make: will you write a plain old monologue, which is an uninterrupted...

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You've selected an ideal moment for your monologue, so here are some tips for getting started with your writing. First of all, a monologue is different from a Shakespearean soliloquy, so you have a decision to make: will you write a plain old monologue, which is an uninterrupted speech by one character towards another character, or a soliloquy, which is a monologue by one character towards him or herself?

If you choose to write a plain old monologue, you could do something interesting with your speech imagining Iago talking directly to Othello or even to Desdemona. Start your writing process with a question: knowing what you know about the play, what questions might Iago want to ask any of these other characters? Perhaps he wants to know why Othello didn't promote him, or why Desdemona thinks she can get away with an untraditional marriage.

If you choose to write a soliloquy, you have an opportunity to explore Iago's character in depth; you could even imagine his past as a way to explain his villainy in the present time. What kinds of incidents might have led Iago to develop this resentful and flawed way of living in the world? Is he an angry person or a depressed person who is acting out, and why is he angry or depressed? This sort of interior exploration can make for a fun and fascinating psychological study.

No matter which kind of monologue you choose, make sure you write the speech as a story, including a moment of climax in the middle and a resolution at the end. A rhetorical question can hook your audience at the start, and so can a seemingly random observation; just make sure that the hook relates to the rest of the speech. At the end of the monologue, ensure that there is a lead-in to what happens next in the play. Good luck!

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The scene where Iago is waiting for Roderigo is a great place for an additional monologue.  Remember a monologue is basically one person speaking.  In this case, Iago is likely to be speaking to himself or to the audience.  If you are having trouble getting started, try brainstorming some ideas.  What might Iago be thinking about?  Consider what has happened in the play and we know will happen when Roderigo arrives?  What does the audience need to know about Iago at this point?  Try to use this monologue to help develop the character of Iago.  You can also use the monologue to foreshadow some of the events to come.  Perhaps, Iago might be thinking to himself how he wants the events of the story to unfold.  Once you have several ideas laid out, put yourself in Iago's shoes.  If you were Iago, what would you say to yourself while waiting for Roderigo.

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