Jimmy shot a basketball from a height of four feet with an upward velocity of 12 feet/sec.    1. Write an equation to model this situation.    2. Will Jimmy’s ball make it to the ten-foot...

Jimmy shot a basketball from a height of four feet with an upward velocity of 12 feet/sec.

    1. Write an equation to model this situation.
    2. Will Jimmy’s ball make it to the ten-foot tall hoop?

Asked on by catd1115

1 Answer | Add Yours

justaguide's profile pic

justaguide | College Teacher | (Level 2) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Jimmy shot the basketball from a height of four feet with an upward velocity of 12 ft/sec. The acceleration due to gravity is 32 ft/sec^2.

Take the independent variable as the time elapsed after the ball is thrown and the dependent variable as the height of the ball.

y = f(t) = 4 + 12*t - (1/2)*32*t^2 = 4 + 12*t - 16t^2

The height of the basketball plotted against time is a parabola. The highest point of the parabola is the value of y at t which is the solution of f'(t) = 0.

f'(t) = 12 - 32t

12 - 32t = 0

=> t = 12/32

At t = 32/12, y = 4 + 12*(12/32) - 16*(12/32)^2

=> 4 + 4.5 - 2.25

=> 6.25

The maximum height of the ball is 6.25 ft. It does not make it to the ten-foot tall hoop.

We’ve answered 318,944 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question