How do the people in the village consider the Lottery?

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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There is no single opinion. The people of the village have mixed feelings. Let me give a breakdown of opinions. 

First, there are those that firmly believe in the lottery. We know this, because they run it, and they do it with zeal. Moreover, they criticize those who want to do away with the lottery. They also believe that the lottery helps with their agriculture. For instance, Old Man Warner firmly believes in it. Here is a dialogue that shows this point:

"Some places have already quit lotteries." Mrs. Adams said.

"Nothing but trouble in that," Old Man Warner said stoutly. "Pack of young fools."

Second, others based on the above quote do not like the lottery. They believe that it serves no purpose and should be changed.  In the end of the story, it is clear that someone like Tessie does not like it. It is probably because she was chosen, but her protest does say something. The story ends with these words:

"It isn't fair, it isn't right," Mrs. Hutchinson screamed, and then they were upon her.

Third, there are young children who probably do not know what is going on. They just do it, because it is tradition. This is probably the most disturbing part of the short story. 

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