How do the others on the island view Simon? Ch.3

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Simon is one of life's unsung heroes, a humane, decent young man who goes out of his way to help others. As well as being the only one to help Ralph build huts on the beach, he also helps the littluns pick fruit.

But the thing about being an unsung hero is that you don't get any credit for doing good. This is especially the case if you're surrounded by a horde of unruly schoolboys who think that being a goody-two-shoes means you're a sissy. And that's pretty how much how most of the boys regard Simon. To them, there's something rather weird about someone with such a strong set of moral values, a firm sense of what's right and wrong. Simon's unique among the boys in that life on the desert island hasn't really changed his personality; he's every bit as devoted to doing the right thing now as he was before the crash. Simply put, Simon doesn't really belong on this island; in fact, he doesn't really belong on this planet, as he's much too good, too gentle for this cruel world. This makes him especially vulnerable to the likes of Jack and Roger, and leads directly to his tragic, brutal demise.

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In chapter three, the other boys view Simon as a bit of a misfit.  He is one of the only older boys who is actually helpful to Ralph and builds huts on the beach for the littluns.  The littluns see Simon, who helps them get fruit off the high-hanging tree branches, as someone who is approachable, not like the intimidating, fierce Jack. 

Simon represents common decency and kindness; because of this, he does not really fit in with Jack's hunters who perceive his goodwill toward the younger boys as weakness.  Ralph, on the other hand, appreciates Simon's help and assistance, knowing that Simon is someone who will be fair and can be depended upon.

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