How do Milton's interpretation of Genesis differ in Paradise Lost?

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Milton's avowed aim in Paradise Lost is to justify the ways of God to man. His emphasis, therefore, is somewhat different from that of Genesis. Milton is a humanist, albeit a Christian one, so his main focus throughout is on the tragic consequences of man's first disobedience.

Milton's humanism also leads him to include the fall of Satan as an important element in the poem. This is Milton's own addition to the creation story of Genesis. He needs to give Satan such a significant role in man's downfall in order to show the limitations of the human mind. Milton's overall purpose in writing Paradise Lost is didactic; he is making an attempt at nothing less than the inculcation of virtue in his readers.

The Genesis story, on the other hand, purports to provide an account of how the universe came into being. It is cosmological where Paradise Lost is moral. It sets out a God's-eye perspective on creation rather than a human one.

In keeping with Milton's humanism is his insistence on free...

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