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How do members of Congress represent their constituents?

Congressmen represent their constituents by voting on measures, arguing for bills, introducing laws and changes, and supporting issues which represent the will of the people in their state.

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The United States of America is very large, and the creators of the Constitution realized that all citizens of the nation would not be able to travel to vote in person on every situation, law, or problem the nation faced. Constituents of each state needed to have government officials who would represent them in both state and national affairs. This representative legislative body is called Congress.

Congress is made up of two houses: the House of Representatives and the Senate. Citizens of the US are able to have a voice in government through their Congressmen in both houses. Senators represent the state in which they reside and serve for six years. Representatives represent a designated district of the state in which they reside and serve for two years.

Constituents in each state can have representation through their Congressmen by voting for these officials and sharing their ideas with them. Each state has unique physical, social, and political issues and concerns. Constituents can call, email, write, petition, and visit their Congressmen to share their ideas, concerns, complaints, and solutions regarding governmental affairs. Constituents can directly, personally request a specific action of a Congressman.

Congressmen are then to act on the expressed sentiments of their constituents by voting on measures, arguing for bills, introducing laws and changes, and supporting issues which represent the will of the people in their state. Congressmen work daily with state, national, and international personnel to create solutions to specific problems in their own state, as well as national issues that will affect their own state. Congressmen also act as an ambassador for their own state, reflecting the character and population of their state in Washington, D.C., across the nation, and around the world.

If constituents feel that their Congressmen are not representing the will of the people in their state, they have the ability to remove them from office through the ballot box. Citizens can choose to elect a different candidate in the next election.

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