How do Mark and Engels announce their intentions in The Communist Manifesto? Why do they believe that it is due time for communists to publish their beliefs openly?

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Marx and Engels announce their intentions by saying the "specter" of communism is haunting Europe, a dramatic and attention grabbing opening. They then announce their intentions as follows:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power. II. It is high time that Communists should...

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Marx and Engels announce their intentions by saying the "specter" of communism is haunting Europe, a dramatic and attention grabbing opening. They then announce their intentions as follows:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power. II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

The image of communism as a frightening, shadowy, and malevolent force from the underworld (hell) that doesn't "belong" on the earth any more than a ghost does is one the capitalists were putting out and one the communists are both mocking and carefully refuting in their manifesto. They are doing so, they say, because communism has already shown itself to be real (not ghostly) and powerful. Second, because the powers-to-be are trying to frighten people with a fairytale version of communism as a terrifying evil, the communists want to push back by clearly stating their views and goals in a rational way.

The manifesto was written in 1847 and published in 1848. The timing was no accident: 1848 was a year in which ordinary people across Europe were so fed up with bad conditions that they were rising up in many places in revolt. In Prussia, for example, the aristocracy had to temporarily cede to socialist demands before they regained the upper hand and beat their enemies back.

Because of the turbulent backdrop of political unrest and a world that seemed on the brink of change, it seemed to the communists the right time to drop their manifesto on a waiting world.

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