The Great Gatsby Questions and Answers
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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How do individuals in The Great Gatsby compromise their happiness?

Individuals in The Great Gatsby compromise their happiness either by settling for too little or demanding too much. Daisy settles for too little with the brutal, self-centered, and racist Tom Buchanan. On the other hand, Gatsby demands too much in wanting Daisy to forget the past five years of her life as if they never happened and run away with him.

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Ironically, individuals in The Great Gatsby compromise their happiness in two opposing ways, either by settling for too little or demanding too much.

Daisy is a character who settles for too little in marrying Tom Buchanan. Extremely wealthy and well connected, he is also a brutal, self-centered, unintelligent, and racist man who cheats on her from the start of their marriage. He has a string of lower-class mistresses; they are women he uses and discards.

Early in the novel, Nick goes to dinner at Tom and Daisy's and learns that Tom is having an affair. Daisy knows about it, but doesn't know who the woman...

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