How do the characters in "A Rose for Emily" and "Paul's Case" compare and contrast in terms of: 1)misfits 2) social acceptance 3) Loneliness & death? How are Emily and Paul both misfits? What...

How do the characters in "A Rose for Emily" and "Paul's Case" compare and contrast in terms of: 1)misfits 2) social acceptance 3) Loneliness & death?

How are Emily and Paul both misfits? What examples illustate this? Why are both concerned about social acceptance and what others think about them?

Expert Answers info

Wallace Field eNotes educator | Certified Educator

briefcaseTeacher (K-12)


calendarEducator since 2016

write6,851 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Arts

Both Emily and Paul are misfits, though she does not choose her alienation; she is raised as a woman apart, her family holding "themselves a little too high for what they really were," according to the people in town. Emily and her family were "thought of . . . as a tableau." She does not seem to seek social acceptance or desire it; she makes few attempts to be gracious, and her privacy seems to constitute her biggest priority. To the extent that she does care, I think she only does so in order to conceal her identity as Homer Barron's murderer—for example, she has the sense to lie to the man she buys poison from—or to avoid compromising her family's status (or what she perceives it to be).

Paul, on the other hand, does...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 386 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

gbeatty eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2007

write2,654 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Science

Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial


ntntuyet | Student

For Emily, nothingness and emptiness bring her long-lasting misery. The death of her father makes her disappointed in life. However, it frees her from dependence.

check Approved by eNotes Editorial