How do cells use glucose for energy?

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Glucose is converted to energy molecules, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) by the process of cellular respiration. The chemical reaction involved in cellular respiration is given as:

`C_6H_12O_6 + 6 O_2 -> 6 CO_2 + 6 H_2O + ATP`

The breakdown of the glucose can take place either in the presence of...

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Glucose is converted to energy molecules, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) by the process of cellular respiration. The chemical reaction involved in cellular respiration is given as:

`C_6H_12O_6 + 6 O_2 -> 6 CO_2 + 6 H_2O + ATP`

The breakdown of the glucose can take place either in the presence of oxygen (aerobic respiration) or absence of oxygen (anaerobic respiration). In aerobic respiration, oxygen is consumed by the cells and carbon dioxide and water are formed, along with energy molecules. Aerobic respiration's energy production is very high as compared to anaerobic respiration. Under aerobic conditions, each molecule of glucose releases around 38 molecules of ATP. In comparison, anaerobic respiration generates only 2 ATP molecules. Part of aerobic respiration takes place in an organelle known as the mitochondria (that is why mitochondria is also called as the power house of the cell).

 

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