How do cells maintain homeostasis?

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Homeostasis is the maintenance of constant conditions. For a cell, homeostasis is maintained by the cellular membrane. This membrane is made up of phospholipids and is a amphipathic bilayer. That is, it consists of both a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic end and is made up of two layers. The cell...

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Homeostasis is the maintenance of constant conditions. For a cell, homeostasis is maintained by the cellular membrane. This membrane is made up of phospholipids and is a amphipathic bilayer. That is, it consists of both a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic end and is made up of two layers. The cell membrane has hydrophilic ends pointing outwards and hydrophobic tails pointing towards each other. This unique configuration allows the cell membrane to control the entry and exit of molecules in and out of the cell. Only the molecules that are necessary for cell are allowed entry, while those that are not necessary are removed from the cell (or not allowed entry). This helps the cell in maintaining constant internal conditions, necessary for its appropriate functioning. 

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