Help with identifying parallelism in the beginning and end of "The Kite Runner."  How do both the beginning (1st chapter) and end (scene with Shorab and the kite) parallel?  Does this paralleling have meaning for the story as a whole and its themes?

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These two parts of the novel are parallel in many ways.  The most obvious is the use of the line "for you, a thousand times over."  We also see the chance for Amir to be good again in the introduction and his carrying out of that in the last chapter.

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These two parts of the novel are parallel in many ways.  The most obvious is the use of the line "for you, a thousand times over."  We also see the chance for Amir to be good again in the introduction and his carrying out of that in the last chapter.

Both excerpts take us back to the tournament and the rape of Hassan.  Seeing Sorhab in a volatile state and Amir becoming nervous because of his memories simply enhance the uneasy feeling that we get when reading this book.

Basically, Housseini is opening and closing a circle: ending where he started.

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