Help with identifying parallelism in the beginning and end of "The Kite Runner."  How do both the begining (1st chapter) and end (scene with Shorab and the kite) parallel? Does this...

Help with identifying parallelism in the beginning and end of "The Kite Runner." 

How do both the begining (1st chapter) and end (scene with Shorab and the kite) parallel? 

Does this paralleling have meaning for the story as a whole and its themes?

Asked on by dance319

2 Answers | Add Yours

spencke's profile pic

spencke | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

These two parts of the novel are parallel in many ways.  The most obvious is the use of the line "for you, a thousand times over."  We also see the chance for Amir to be good again in the introduction and his carrying out of that in the last chapter.

Both excerpts take us back to the tournament and the rape of Hassan.  Seeing Sorhab in a volatile state and Amir becoming nervous because of his memories simply enhance the uneasy feeling that we get when reading this book.

Basically, Housseini is opening and closing a circle: ending where he started.

bargeroni's profile pic

bargeroni | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Agreeing with @spencke above. Here are some comments that they did not cover:

There has been a lot of progress in Amir's character from where we begin the novel to the ending. The 'way to be good again' is most prominent as at the end of the novel, he has redeemed himself by caring for Sohrab. The kite running is a very symbollic element of the novel. It is mentioned at the beginning and at the end a kite running tournament is happening. "Hassan the harelipped kite runner" -harelipped implies a touch of imperfection, also a suffering. The kite runner at the end (Amir) is also a suffrer, one who has made himself suffer through guilt and become a selfless human being. Sohrab also flying the kite is a sufferer. Suffering is a prominent theme throughout kite runner.

Hope this brief comparison is helpful :-)

We’ve answered 318,913 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question