How do anthropologists explain human violence? Describe an alternative explanation for human violence that is not anthropological  How do anthropologists explain human violence? Describe an...

How do anthropologists explain human violence? Describe an alternative explanation for human violence that is not anthropological  

How do anthropologists explain human violence? Describe an alternative explanation for human violence that is not anthropological

 

Asked on by lilmamatiff

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Violence is a way of communicating. It was used before we had complex language. Anthropologists see violence as a power struggle. The most powerful person in the tribe is the alpha, or leader. Another way to look at it is that violence is part of our modern society, even though we like to pretend that it isn't
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Jessica Pope | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

Anthropologists study violence through the lens of human cultural development. They usually focus on institutionalized violence such as warfare and genital mutilation. They also study subcultural violence like fraternity hazing. Anthropologists see violence as a means of establishing and maintaining hierarchy within a cultural group. People who undergo violent rituals to become part of a group are likely to invest great time and energy into protecting that group. They will highly value their group membership group because it was so painful to become initiated.

One non-anthropological approach to explaining human violence is the psychological approach. The psychological approach explains violence by describing what happens within the psyche of the individual perpetrating the violence. A psychological approach to explaining violence emphasizes individual motivations rather than cultures and institutions.

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