In The Kite Runner, how do Amir and Hassan represent the divisions in Afghan society, and how do these divisions affect the courses their lives take?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Amir and Hassan are born into two different Afghani ethnic groups and social classes, and these divisions between them lead to the tragic end of their friendship. Two boys who would otherwise have been lifelong friends are torn apart because of prejudices toward the Afghani minority group, the Hazaras.

Amir and his father Baba are upper class citizens and part of the ethnic majority, the Pashtuns. Hassan and his father Ali, on the other hand, are part of the ethnic minority group, the Hazaras. As such, they are discriminated against and not allowed an education. They are considered a servant class. Ali was adopted by Baba's family when Ali and Baba were children, after Ali's parents were killed. However, as a Hazara, Ali was still inferior to the family and became their servant since he could not be taken in and treated as equal. Ali remains a loyal servant to Baba for decades, and then his son Hassan also becomes a servant, specifically to Amir.

Although Amir and Hassan grow up together...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 1061 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial
Approved by eNotes Editorial Team

Posted on

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles
Approved by eNotes Editorial Team

Posted on

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles
Approved by eNotes Editorial Team

Posted on