How do all of Newtons laws relate to each other?  

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Neon's three laws describe the relationship between the motion of objects and forces acting on the objects. Motion is produced by a force, which can be thought of as a push or a pull.

Newton's First Law says that an object in motion will stay in motion or an object...

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Neon's three laws describe the relationship between the motion of objects and forces acting on the objects. Motion is produced by a force, which can be thought of as a push or a pull.

Newton's First Law says that an object in motion will stay in motion or an object at rest will stay at rest unless acted on by a force. In other words, force is necessary to change the speed or direction of a moving or still object. This is also known as the law of inertia. All objects with mass have inertia, which is resistance to change in direction.

Newton's Second Law is F=ma, or force = mass x acceleration. It says that a force acting on an object will accelerate is by an amount that's proportional to the force and inversely proportional to its mass. Force in this case is the vector sum of all forces acting on the object, and the acceleration produced in a vector quantity in the direction of the force.

Newton's Third Law says that when an object exerts a force on another object, the second object also exerts a force on the first object that is equal in magnitude an in the opposite direction. These two forces are called action and reaction forces. Motion of objects is thus produced by pairs of forces, as a force can only be applied to an object by a second object. These pairs of forces produce propulsion, for example people walking, car tires moving on roads and the thrust of rockets.

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Newton's three laws of motion relate to each other in that they lay a foundation for the principles of things in motion, then build upon that foundation.  For example, the first law of motion, called the law of inertia, establishes that objects that have a certain mass possess a resistance to changes in their motion.  That resistance is called inertia.  Objects with a lot of mass have a large inertia, they are hard to get to move, and once they are moving, hard to stop.  This relates directly to the second law, which is also called the force law.  The force generated by an object is the product of its mass times the acceleration placed upon the object.  The object from the law one example had a large mass, which meant it possessed a large inertia.  It is hard to move and hard to stop.  That inertia is a major factor in determining the force that object generates when it is accelerating at a given rate.  The third law ties in well with the first two, it states "for every action force, there is an equal and opposite reaction force."  In the creation of a force, there are the two parts from law two, the mass and the acceleration to consider.  If an object has a larger mass, it has a larger inertia.  It doesn't need as much acceleration to counter an opposing force of an object that has less mass, less inertia, but is moving at a higher rate of acceleration.

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Newtons first law of motion is often called the inertia law.  Inertia is an objects tendency to resist changes in motion.  The larger things are, the more they weigh, because they have more mass.  It takes more energy to get them to move and more energy to get them to stop once they are moving.  

The second law of motion is called the force law.  An objects force it creates is a product of its mass times the acceleration placed on it.  What that means is, that larger object can create a big force because it has more mass in it.  A smaller object can generate the same amount of force, but it has to be traveling faster.  A small football player can still knock you off your feet if he comes flying in full speed, despite his smaller mass.  

Lastly, there is the third law of motion, which states for every action force, there is an equal and opposite reaction force.  That is true, but the same variables of mass and acceleration still apply.  If you and your friend are on skates and push apart from each other, theoretically you and your friend will move apart from each other the same distance and speed.  But if your friend is larger than you, he/she will move slower and less distance, while you will go faster and more distance.  The force created on both sides was equal, but arrived at with different numbers.

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