How are the different fathers presented in 'To Kill a Mockingbird' - in comparison to one another?i am writing an essay and i am really struggling because i haven't the slightest idea where to...

How are the different fathers presented in 'To Kill a Mockingbird' - in comparison to one another?

i am writing an essay and i am really struggling because i haven't the slightest idea where to start. i need some notes that i can jott down to help me plan my essay. I have a few ideas for atticus finch as a father, but don't know about the others :s ... For example: what do we know about mr Cunningham as a father and what chapters is this info' given? (or about mr radley/dill's stepfather)

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troutmiller eNotes educator| Certified Educator

What we learn from Mr. Cunningham is basically in chapter 15 when he gets the men to leave Atticus and Tom alone.  He shows that he can put himself in Atticus' shoes.  He wouldn't want his kids around that kind of violence either.  We know he's a hard worker and won't take anything off anyone that he can't pay back.  That was stated about the family in chapter 2.

Mr. Ewell can be best described in his testimony in chapter 17.  Of course much can be learned about how low he'd stoop (by trying to kill children) in chapter 29.

Dill's step father isn't really mentioned much except for the fact that he'd rather Dill go play outside so he and Dill's mother can be alone together.  That was stated in chapter 14.

Mr. Radley was only discusses in the first chapter when it explained his reasons for putting his son away forever.  Also, having his son come "take over" the same role after his death showed how he wanted things to continue even after his death.

Hopefully you can find these sections and get some ideas down.  Perhaps in the essay you can show how both Atticus and Walter are similar in their ways despite money issues, and Mr. Radley and Ewell have had negative results with their children.  Good luck!

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To Kill a Mockingbird

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