How did the women's rights movement evolve out of other reform movements, especially the abolition movement?

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The abolition movement and other reform movements in the antebellum period provided women with an outlet and a forum for political activity that was otherwise closed to them. Women were not allowed to vote in any state in the antebellum period, and the culture of "separate spheres" dictated that theirs...

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The abolition movement and other reform movements in the antebellum period provided women with an outlet and a forum for political activity that was otherwise closed to them. Women were not allowed to vote in any state in the antebellum period, and the culture of "separate spheres" dictated that theirs was to be a domestic role. But they could and did join voluntary organizations that promoted such reforms as abolition and temperance. This led some women to recognize the tensions between the egalitarian rhetoric of abolitionism and the realities women faced. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, for example, were barred from participating in the World Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1840. This affront motivated the two women (who actually met at the convention) to begin to advocate for women's rights. Their efforts culminated with the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, in which Stanton famously called for the right to vote for women. It should be noted as well that some noted male abolitionists, Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison for example, were supporters of women's rights.

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