How did the women's suffrage movement in Canada affect the people concerned?

The women's suffrage or franchise movement in Canada affected women not just in terms of voting rights, but also citizenship, healthcare, domestic violence, education, and employment.

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The women's suffrage movement in Canada started to gain traction in the late 1800s. Groups of women fought against universally enacted laws across the country that gave only men full citizenship and voting rights at both the provincial level and the federal level. Since men were subject to military service,...

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The women's suffrage movement in Canada started to gain traction in the late 1800s. Groups of women fought against universally enacted laws across the country that gave only men full citizenship and voting rights at both the provincial level and the federal level. Since men were subject to military service, society widely accepted the notion that voting rights and better healthcare services should remain exclusive to men.

Women continued to be marginalized socially and financially within their homes. They, along with their children, were subject to harsh discipline from their husbands, from which they had little to no legal recourse.

Many of these early Canadian suffragists were middle-class women fighting against injustices in the home as well as women attending universities (the first generations of their families to do so) looking to become professionals in such areas of journalism, healthcare, and education. Those who did manage to secure employment were paid far less than their male counterparts.

At the beginning of the 20th century, suffragists started to see small local improvements to their cause. More and more women were becoming property owners, which, in some municipalities, granted them the right to vote in elections for such groups as school boards and park boards.

In 1916, women in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta won the right to vote and the ability to hold a provincial office. In 1917, Ontario's Conservative government became the first of its kind to give women voting rights. By 1918, women throughout the country were able to vote in federal elections.

However, these suffrage victories were largely restricted to white women. For example, Asian women weren't allowed to vote until 1948, and Indigenous women were excluded from voting rights until the early 1960s.

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