How did the rise of the market economy and industrialization influence relationships within families and communities?

The rise of the market economy and industrialization influenced relationships within families and communities by leading to major shifts in how and where people lived, worked, and procured goods. Before these changes, families and communities were close-knit and largely self-sufficient. Afterward, many people worked outside the home in factories.

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The rise of the market economy and industrialization in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries definitely had an influence on relationships within families and communities. Before these major economic and technological changes took place, families and communities were more tightly knit, working together to provide everything they needed for themselves. Most...

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The rise of the market economy and industrialization in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries definitely had an influence on relationships within families and communities. Before these major economic and technological changes took place, families and communities were more tightly knit, working together to provide everything they needed for themselves. Most families farmed their own food, and specialty items were purchased by local craftsmen. With the changes brought by industrialization, it was possible to increase productivity in agriculture and manufacturing. This meant that there was a shift from family self-sufficiency and local community specialization in goods to an economy where more people purchased industrial goods.

In addition to the change in where people got their food and products, the rise of the market economy and industrialization also led to major changes in how and where people worked. Prior to this shift, people generally worked on their own property, taking care of family farms or their own artisan shops. However, the rise of the market economy and industrialization led to a society in which more people worked jobs outside of their homes. Factories were common places of employment, and it was often expected that all members of the family would work, including children. This contributed to the growing sense of individualism among Americans during this time.

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