How did the professor respond to Susan and Peter after their account of Lucy's story?

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The Professor in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe has one of the most reasonable responses that could be imagined in such a situation. In reality, his calm demeanor is aided by his knowledge of Narnia from his experience there as a young boy. However, discounting this fact (since...

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The Professor in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe has one of the most reasonable responses that could be imagined in such a situation. In reality, his calm demeanor is aided by his knowledge of Narnia from his experience there as a young boy. However, discounting this fact (since the children don't know it), he seems to have an incredibly measured, logical response.

After listening carefully and allowing the children to explain the story, he comes back with a set of conclusions: Lucy is either lying or making up a game, which seems unlike her; she is crazy, which by all accounts she is not; or she is telling the truth. In the Professor's estimation, they have to give some credence to her experience simply because there is little other room for explanation.

At the end of the discussion, he balks at the children, who argue against his conclusion. He is perturbed, questioning if they'd ever been taught logic or reasoning in school. This is humorous commentary on the society that, in Lewis's eyes, was venturing further away from reasoning and refused to believe in magical or miraculous events.

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