The French and Indian War (The Seven Years' War)

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How did the French and Indian War change the relationship between England and its American colonies?

The French and Indian War changed the relationship between England and its American colonies in that its outcome eliminated the colonies' need for the British military and led to the Proclamation of 1763, the Quartering Act, and various taxes, all of which angered the colonists and contributed to the American Revolution.

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The French and Indian War changed the relationship between the American colonies and Great Britain in two pivotal ways.

Most importantly, once the French were expelled from American territories and the Native Americans could no longer count on them as allies, a great threat lifted for the English colonies. They no longer had to worry that the French would take them over. At this point, they had no need of the British: once the French were gone, the Americans did not need British military might to back them up.

Hereafter, the British became a nuisance, a hindrance rather than a help. Adding to this problem, the British began to make themselves even more of a burden by insisting the Americans contribute to paying for the costly French and Indian war. The British reasoned that since the war had been largely fought for their benefit, the colonists should help defray its cost. This (and other economic issues in Britain) led the British to impose new tariffs and also tighten up on their policy...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 827 words.)

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