How did T.S. Eliot make his literature "new" or modern?

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This is a very broad question because T.S. Eliot was a prolific writer; so it might be more helpful to analyze just one of his works for modernism.  Below are general modern or new characteristics of Eliot's writing.

1. Disillusionment--the overall theme of modern literature (American and British) is disillusionment....

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This is a very broad question because T.S. Eliot was a prolific writer; so it might be more helpful to analyze just one of his works for modernism.  Below are general modern or new characteristics of Eliot's writing.

1. Disillusionment--the overall theme of modern literature (American and British) is disillusionment. Eliot wrote during a time when the world knew major wars, depressions, and the rise of oppressive regimes; so it is not difficult to see why so many modern writers discuss a general disillusionment or pessimism toward their world. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" and "The Hollow Men" are specific examples of an existentialist, "life is meaningless" view of life.

2. Interesting poetic devices--Along with Ezra Pound, Eliot began experimenting with various forms of poetry, ranging from imagism to symbolism. They abandoned strict structure and rhyme schemes and developed a more organic type of poetry, sometimes reminiscent of Walt Whitman's avant garde techniques.

As mentioned earlier, this is a generalized answer not dealing with specific works.

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