How did Salutary Neglect encourage the American colonists to lead a revolution?  

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Throughout much of the history of the Thirteen Colonies, the practice of salutary neglect encouraged and fostered a strong feeling of independence among the colonists. They had come to feel that life in North America allowed them a degree of freedom and independence that their brethren in Great Britain did...

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Throughout much of the history of the Thirteen Colonies, the practice of salutary neglect encouraged and fostered a strong feeling of independence among the colonists. They had come to feel that life in North America allowed them a degree of freedom and independence that their brethren in Great Britain did not enjoy. Over a period of about one hundred fifty years, the colonists felt entitled to a large degree of self-rule and that placed them outside of the direct jurisdiction of the English Parliament. In the 1690s, when Parliament began taking an even more hands-off approach to managing the colonies, this feeling of independence only deepened.

This feeling was shattered after the French and Indian War. In an effort to recoup its financial losses from the conflict, Parliament began imposing (and actually collecting) more taxes from the colonies. They also started stationing more soldiers in the region to help protect the colonies from further attacks, an expensive endeavor for sure. This sudden attention in exercising its imperial powers in the colonies greatly upset and worried many colonists who had grown accustomed to the rather independent nature of their society. Many of Parliament's efforts, therefore, resulted in a backlash that would sow the seeds for revolution.

When viewed from this perspective, we can see that the American War for Independence was an attempt to restore the freedoms that the colonists had enjoyed under the system of salutary neglect.

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Salutary Neglect was the de facto policy of the British which afforded the American colonies a high degree of autonomy. It was believed that enforcing taxes and other laws was too expensive to enforce and was not worth the hassle. Enforcement of strong British laws could also lead to insurrection on the part of the colonists. As a result of Salutary Neglect, the colonists began to feel a separation from England. They developed their own socio-political institutions and were prospering in trade and commerce during this period (1690-1760).
The Seven Year's War (French and Indian War) forced the British to re-examine their relationship with the colonies in the New World. The British had incurred heavy war debt as a result of the conflict. The colonies were now to be considered an avenue for producing revenue. This is why the British started to enforce their tax laws and created more of a military presence in the colonies. After being left to their own devices for such an extended period of time, the American colonists were not in a position to allow such interference on their political and economic future.

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